The Americas Quarterly 4th Quarter : Page 32

project showcase T HE LOVETT SCHOOL [ Atlanta ] S The designers made practical use of the dining room’s columns, outfitting each with a two-tiered condiment, silver and napkin station. Younger students can reach items on the lower tier easily. By Lisa Bertagnoli tudents at The Lovett School in Atlanta probably didn’t realize it, but they were getting a history lesson every day at lunch. Foodservice history, to be sure, but history all the same. The school’s cafeteria, built in 1960, had what was likely one of the last circle-serve cafeteria lines in the country, says Kip Serfozo, proj-ect manager at Cama-cho Associates, Atlanta, and senior associate FCSI. The antiquated serving line, plus mix-and-match equipment and a queue system that resulted in slow meal periods for the school’s 1,589 students, didn’t quite fit in at a private day school that charges $25,000 a year for tuition, he says. School administra-tors called on Camacho to give a fresh, sophisti-cated look to the 1,500-sq.-ft. servery and 300-sq.-ft. faculty dining room, neither of which had been touched in 50-plus years. (Not true of the main kitchen where periodic updates over the decades kept it in good shape.) The design team’s specific assignments: Allow for efficient flow of the existing student population without raising labor costs. Specify kitchen equip-ment able to sup-port the new USDA. MyPlate guidelines, a retooling of the old food pyramid that includes a strong educational component. Create an attractive, self-serve salad bar, a specialty area ca-pable of turning out daily specials. Foodservice Director Statler asked for an expanded salad bar, which has 20% more selections than the one in the former servery. Photos by Rob Byko Photography 32 4Q 2012 • FCSI The Americas Quarterly

The Lovett School

Lisa Bertagnoli

[Atlanta]<br /> <br /> Students at The Lovett School in Atlanta probably didn’t realize it, but they were getting a history lesson every day at lunch. Foodservice history, to be sure, but history all the same.<br /> <br /> The school’s cafeteria, built in 1960, had what was likely one of the last circle-serve cafeteria lines in the country, says Kip Serfozo, project manager at Camacho Associates, Atlanta, and senior associate FCSI. The antiquated serving line, plus mixand- match equipment and a queue system that resulted in slow meal periods for the school’s 1,589 students, didn’t quite fit in at a private day school that charges $25,000 a year for tuition, he says.<br /> <br /> School administrators called on Camacho to give a fresh, sophisticated look to the 1,500- sq.-ft. servery and 300-sq.-ft. faculty dining room, neither of which had been touched in 50-plus years. (Not true of the main kitchen where periodic updates over the decades kept it in good shape.)<br /> <br /> The design team’s specific assignments: Allow for efficient flow of the existing student population without raising labor costs. Specify kitchen equipment able to support the new USDA. MyPlate guidelines, a retooling of the old food pyramid that includes a strong educational component. Create an attractive, selfserve salad bar, a specialty area capable of turning out daily specials.<br /> <br /> Design a youthful, modern café with attractively merchandised food selections. And for extra credit, package it all in a display kitchen with ergonomically correct, easy-to-clean, energyefficient equipment.<br /> <br /> The team—principal Camacho, Serfozo and project coordinator Anja Kuchenmiester—met with the school’s foodservice director several times before embarking on the project. Foodservice Director Meredith Statler, who formerly worked in college foodservice and is still a member of NACUFS, wanted to bring some of that college and university edge into the servery, Serfozo says.<br /> <br /> Statler had several issues she wanted resolved, too. One was queuing: The school’s students, ranging in age from kindergarten to high-school senior, eat lunch in four shifts. “We had to be conscientious of how kids would go to the different (food) stations and exit efficiently,” Serfozo says.<br /> <br /> Another was the menu, which the foodservice director wanted to update to include a bigger salad bar and more daily special menu options.<br /> <br /> To meet almost all of the director’s requests, Serfozo and his team specified one major piece of equipment, a 84’-long Delfield Custom Concepts stainless service line that snakes along the back of the servery. The line holds a salad bar; griddle for burgers, grilled cheese and other popular school lunch dishes; induction cooker for daily specials; and prep sinks, hand sinks and other display-cooking necessities.<br /> <br /> The bar includes undercounter refrigeration and storage for ingredients, which are prepped in the back of the house. The team added two high-efficiency Frymaster fryers to the kitchen to produce a better product and reduce oil usage.<br /> <br /> To prevent holdups during lunch service, the designers created three dessert areas and four beverage stations, with juice dispensers as well as bulk milk dispensers to minimize waste from milk cartons. “This is a big ‘green’ initiative that not many K-12 schools are doing,” Serfozo points out.<br /> <br /> Students can help themselves to condiments, flatware and napkins at two stations, which are constructed around pillars in the dining room. The stations have two shelves—one higher, one lower—to enable students from the lower grades to easily help themselves. Two lines instead of one at the popular entrée and chef’s specials stations also add peace and order to lunchtime.<br /> <br /> The design team encountered one challenge: a column, smack-dab in the middle of the servery, wrapped with an automatstyle revolving server. Prior to the redesign, cooks loaded the server with plated food from the back, and students took what they wanted from the front. The “wheel,” as Serfozo calls it, had no place in a contemporary servery, but he was afraid to totally tear it out for fear of damaging whatever utility chases were ensconced in the column. The construction crew removed the wheel, but kept the column, around which Serfozo and his team built the serving line.<br /> <br /> Upgrades included a scrubbable drop ceiling, new flooring, a combination of long cafeteria-style tables with bench seating and roundtops with moveable seating, plus new lighting.<br /> <br /> Actual construction took about four months, most of which was during the school’s summer break. Students returning to Lovett last August found a bright, fresh cafeteria and peppy new menu, including a salad bar offering 20% more items and a changing daily menu of chef’s specials, from paninis to fresh-made pasta. Sophisticated touches include gold-handled Bon Chef soup wells on the hot line.<br /> <br /> The school is thrilled with the results, calling the finished product “a bright and fun atmosphere for the whole campus.” Serfozo and the design team are pleased as well, for a more practical reason.<br /> <br /> “The challenge was, we were designing a servery that would require more labor,” Serfozo explains, “but in the end, they were able to maintain the exact same labor as they did in the old design.”<br /> <br /> Design Consultants:<br /> James Camacho, FCSI,<br /> CDT, CSI, principal; Kip<br /> Serfozo, senior associate<br /> FCSI, LEED AP,<br /> project manager; Anja<br /> Kuchenmiester, project<br /> coordinator; Camacho<br /> Associates, Atlanta, Ga.<br /> Project: K-12 Student<br /> Servery & Dining Room;<br /> Faculty Dining Room<br /> Total Budget:<br /> $947,000; Equipment<br /> Portion: $260,000<br /> Scope of Work:<br /> Design Development,<br /> Construction Documents,<br /> Construction<br /> Administration<br /> Architect: Richard<br /> Wittschiebe Hand, RWH<br /> Design, Atlanta<br /> Architect and Interior<br /> Designer: Janice N.<br /> Wittschiebe, partner,<br /> and Michael Snyder,<br /> project architect, RWH<br /> Design, Atlanta<br /> <br /> Key Equipment <br /> <br /> Delfield Custom Concepts serving line <br /> Gaylord hoods <br /> Frymaster high-efficiency fryers (two) <br /> CookTek induction cooker<br />

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