Clinical Oncologist Daily Day 1 Saturday June 4, 2016 : Page 1

Saturday June 4, 2016 1 st EDITION Chicago • FREE Adaptive Biotechnologies: Unlocking the Secrets of the Immune System to Empower Oncologists Chad Robins is the president, CEO and co-founder of Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation. Q: Tell us about Adaptive’s beginnings. What led you to found the company? A: My brother Harlan and I founded Adap-tive Biotechnologies continued on page 20 The MassARRAY System — Flexible Genetic Analysis for Targeted Mutation Detection Clinical laboratories doing genetic testing must balance changes in relevant targets, demands for increasing test sen-sitivity and increasing costs of analysis. Agena Bioscience offers flexibility on its MassARRAY System with easily customizable assay content and cost-efficient chemistries. “From a genetic lab per-spective, most oncology testing that has proven and relevant content falls into a range of tens to a couple hundred markers,” continued on page 20 Harness the Power of NGS for Personalized Medicine Jim Godsey, VP research and development, clinical NGS and oncology, Thermo Fisher Scientific, recently discussed harnessing the power of multigene, targeted next-genera-tion sequencing and the different approaches to advancing personalized medicine it offers. Q: In the last year, how has personalized medicine im-proved oncology treatment? A: Sophisticated gene panels have become more widely avail-able to use targeted next-genera-continued on page 30 Bio-Rad’s QX200 ddPCR System is First Digital PCR Instrument to Receive CE IVD Mark HERCULES, Calif. — Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb) announced CE IVD marking for its QX200 Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) System, the first digital PCR system with the CE IVD mark for use as an in vitro diagnostic (IVD) in the European Union. With the CE IVD mark, medical practitioners in Eu-rope can use the QX200 system for highly accurate de-tection and quantification of nucleic acids, aiding clinical decision-making in the treatment of dis-eases ranging from continued on page 39 Celprogen Introduces 3-D Cell Culture and PDX Model Systems for Oncology Research Article Courtesy of Celprogen Celprogen’s, CSCs, CTCs and parental cancer cells grown in 2-D can easily be killed by low doses of chemotherapeutic drugs or low doses of radiation. If those same cells are grown in 3-D, they are resistant to the same doses of chemotherapeutic drugs or radiation just like cancer as it’s found in the body. In this way, cells grown in 3-D are more valid continued on page 41 DiaCarta Receives CLIA Certifica-tion and Partners With Pangaea Biotech to Launch Liquid Biopsy Tests to Detect Cancer Mutations Article Courtesy of DiaCarta RICHMOND, Calif. — DiaCarta Inc., an innovative translational genomics and precision molecular diagnos-tics company, has recently announced that DiaCarta Clin-ical Services Laboratory successfully passed the state of California survey under the Clinical Laboratory Improve-ment Amendments of 1988 (CLIA). The state of Califor-nia inspector gave DCSL permission to continued on page 39 Demand Definite Answers — The Value of the Genoptix Approach The following is a paid advertisement of Genoptix, Inc. Genoptix Medical Laboratory is a CLIA-certified and CAP-accredited clinical laboratory that offers specialized comprehensive testing services in oncology diagnostics. Genoptix is a center of excellence for hematopathology and solid tumor molecular pro-filing, and serves as a collabora-tive partner for clinicians and pathologists requiring oncology-testing services. Demand for molecular on-cology testing has grown rapidly continued on page 41 Practice Analytics: Selecting the Right Tool to Measure Efficiency of Operations and Value of Care The U.S. health care system is changing in countless, complex ways — but perhaps no change is more far-reaching than the move to value-based care. Community-based specialty physician practices are under growing pressure to demonstrate to pur-chasers (patients, payers, em-ployers, etc.) that they can deliver high-quality health care services at an affordable and competitive cost. To create a clear picture of value, practices continued on page 41 Advancing Diagnostics Through Innovations Article Courtesy of Novodiax Novodiax is a California-based corporation, located in the San Francisco Bay Area. Novodiax has developed a pro-prietary supersensitive signal amplification technology through intelligent structural designs and optimal poly-merization. The first product of this technology, polyHRP (horseradish peroxidase) has demonstrated superior detection sensitivity at low background in various applications, such as im-munohistochemistry (IHC) and continued on page 20

Adaptive Biotechnologies: Unlocking the Secrets of the Immune System to Empower Oncologists

Chad Robins is the president, CEO and co-founder of Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation.

Q: Tell us about Adaptive’s beginnings. What led you to found the company?

A: My brother Harlan and I founded Adaptive Biotechnologies based on the groundbreaking idea that profiling T and B-cell receptors at high throughput would revolutionize the way that scientists and clinicians understand the adaptive immune system. Our team pioneered a field now known as ‘immunosequencing’ by developing an innovative platform that leverages proprietary chemistries, next-generation sequencing and sophisticated bioinformatics. Our immunoSEQ platform enables immune system discoveries that will change the course of medicine.

Q: How is Adaptive’s work relevant to the average clinical oncologist or hematologist?

A: Adaptive’s immunosequencing platform is advancing the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in several clinically impactful ways:

• Advancing basic cancer research by enabling scientists to elucidate immune-related mechanisms of disease and treatment.

• Accelerating pharma companies’ efforts by incorporating our assay into clinical trials to predict the efficacy and safety of innovative cancer immunotherapies.

• Arming hematologists with our clonoSEQ Process, a highly sensitive and accurate tool for clinical monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) in lymphoid cancers, allowing detection of relapses significantly earlier than other techniques.

• Enabling Adaptive to pursue discovery of native T-cell receptors with the power to attack cancer antigens, fueling development of T-cell therapeutics with potential efficacy against solid tumors.

These applications represent just a few of the potentially game-changing ways our technology can impact patient care in cancer, as well as in autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases.

Q: What current Adaptive effort are you most excited about for its potential to positively impact cancer patients?

A: I believe Adaptive is in a truly unique position. With the clonoSEQ Process, we have a market-leading, sequencing-based clinical diagnostic with more than 20 peer-reviewed publications demonstrating its clinical validity in the identification and tracking of MRD. Currently, we are integrating the clonoSEQ Process into a wide range of global clinical trial protocols that are designed to define eligibility, inform patient stratification, direct treatment and serve as a primary endpoint to assess effectiveness of innovative therapies. We expect these trials will demonstrate the clinical utility of the clonoSEQ Process, providing even stronger rationale for adoption in the clinic.

Q: What could Adaptive’s work mean for cancer patients 10 years from now?

A: Much like disease staging and mutation analysis are standard parts of the diagnosis paradigm today, I anticipate that in 10 years, all cancer patients will also have their immune profiles evaluated at diagnosis. Immune profiling information generated using Adaptive’s platform will be used to inform treatment selection, combination and sequencing, as well as to monitor the effectiveness of these treatments over time. Some of the treatments clinicians employ 10 years from now may even have been discovered using Adaptive’s platform. In hematologic malignancies, immunosequencing will replace standard techniques for monitoring MRD and may even allow clinicians to monitor disease less invasively. In summary, I expect that immunosequencing will be a ubiquitous tool in the oncology clinic that transforms cancer diagnosis and treatment, and that Adaptive is positioned to be the company enabling this revolution in patient care.

Q: How can our readers find out more about your company?

A: For more information, visit www.adaptivebiotech.com/asco or come see us at Booth #2056.

immunoSEQ and clonoSEQ are registered trademarks of Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Adaptive+Biotechnologies%3A+Unlocking+the+Secrets+of+the+Immune+System+to+Empower+Oncologists/2499676/306841/article.html.

The MassARRAY System — Flexible Genetic Analysis for Targeted Mutation Detection

Clinical laboratories doing genetic testing must balance changes in relevant targets, demands for increasing test sensitivity and increasing costs of analysis. Agena Bioscience offers flexibility on its MassARRAY System with easily customizable assay content and cost-efficient chemistries.

“From a genetic lab perspective, most oncology testing that has proven and relevant content falls into a range of tens to a couple hundred markers,” says Pete Dansky, CEO of Agena Bioscience. “This type of targeted approach fits perfectly with the MassARRAY System’s capability.”

For targeted somatic mutation testing, Agena Bioscience offers a suite of chemistries for any level of detection sensitivity. With a unique, mass-based approach for nucleic acid detection, the MassARRAY System incorporates each of these chemistries in a single-day workflow.

The newest of the three solutions, iPLEX HS for high sensitivity, covers the 1 to 10 percent sensitivity range. With an ability to multiplex up to 15 targets in a single well from a mere 20 nanograms of DNA, iPLEX HS delivers high-value data for oncology applications. Ultra- SEEK chemistry, which offers detection capabilities down to 0.1 percent sensitivity, is ideally suited for liquid biopsy samples that contain low-level somatic variants. For routine genotyping, iPLEX Pro provides reliable testing for applications such as inherited disease and pharmacogenetics testing.

Another key benefit of the MassARRAY System is that it enables rapid test development. Assays can be designed and multiplexed via Agena Bioscience’s online Assay Design Suite or custom services.

“In a matter of days, new assays can be designed and ordered, ready for verification and ultimately routine testing,” added Dansky.

A combination of these reagents with the MassARRAY System positions the platform well for the oncology testing market. With speedy customization, costeffective multiplexing and highly sensitive chemistry, laboratories can resolve genetic targets more easily and maintain necessary flexibility to incorporate newly discovered markers.

Learn more about flexible mutation detection with the MassARRAY System by visiting Booth #22161 at ASCO 2016.

iPLEX and MassARRAY are registered trademarks of Agena Bioscience, Inc. UltraSEEK is a trademark of Agena Bioscience, Inc.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/The+MassARRAY+System+%E2%80%94+Flexible+Genetic+Analysis+for+Targeted+Mutation+Detection/2499677/306841/article.html.

Harness the Power of NGS for Personalized Medicine

Jim Godsey, VP research and development, clinical NGS and oncology, Thermo Fisher Scientific, recently discussed harnessing the power of multigene, targeted next-generation sequencing and the different approaches to advancing personalized medicine it offers.

Q: In the last year, how has personalized medicine improved oncology treatment?

A: Sophisticated gene panels have become more widely available to use targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze tumor samples for hundreds of mutations at once. It is now possible, starting with very small amounts of tumor sample to efficiently identify cancer mutations for which a targeted drug exists and assign a treatment. In a nationwide clinical trial called the NCI-MATCH (Molecular Analysis of Therapy Choice), several leading institutions are participating to study the effectiveness of treating cancers according to their molecular abnormalities.

Q: In terms of specific cancer, where do you think personalized medicine has had the most impact in this industry?

A: Thanks to studies that have led to a better understanding of how changes in genes can cause cancer, and applying that information to making targeted drugs to stop these cancer genes, the diagnosis and treatment for lung, colon and breast cancers have advanced significantly over the years. Gene profiling is already standard of care for some of these well-studied cancers. We can now apply this knowledge to study more rare cancers to improve diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

Q: Immunotherapy is said to fight cancer by stimulating a person’s immune system to work harder and smarter to fight cancer cells. How exactly is the body motivated to do this without the use of man-made proteins?

A: Given the early positive results seen in recent clinical studies, immunotherapy is an exciting area. Earlier approaches to treatment focused on using man-made proteins or drugs to kill cancer cells directly. Scientists are now developing drugs or methods that stimulate a patient’s immune cells to become more efficient cancer fighters using immunotherapy. Developing a baseline understanding of each patient’s cancer and immune cells at the genomic level will likely benefit all of the different strategies clinical researchers have used to activate the immune system.

Q: In the next three years, where do you see the adoption of multigene approaches and next-generation sequencing heading?

A: We believe that a key to advancing personalized medicine is building strategic partnerships with pharmaceutical companies and clinical researchers to develop multigene, NGS-based companion diagnostic assays (panels). Such a test could be performed to guide targeted therapy selection specific to the patient, ultimately improving his or her quality of life. We also see a future in a less-invasive method to collect samples, such as a routine blood draw. This ‘liquid biopsy’ can serve as the starting sample for testing. Thermo Fisher Scientific is committed to projects such as these to advance personalized medicine.

Learn more in Booth #2062 or at www.thermofisher.com

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Harness+the+Power+of+NGS+for+Personalized+Medicine/2499678/306841/article.html.

Bio-Rad’s QX200 ddPCR System is First Digital PCR Instrument to Receive CE IVD Mark

HERCULES, Calif. — Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb) announced CE IVD marking for its QX200 Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) System, the first digital PCR system with the CE IVD mark for use as an in vitro diagnostic (IVD) in the European Union.

With the CE IVD mark, medical practitioners in Europe can use the QX200 system for highly accurate detection and quantification of nucleic acids, aiding clinical decision-making in the treatment of diseases ranging from cancer to transplant rejection and viral infection.

“CE IVD marking of the QX200 ddPCR System is Bio-Rad’s first step in extending ddPCR technology to the clinic,” said Annette Tumolo, executive vice president for Bio-Rad’s Digital Biology Group. “As a diagnostic tool, our system is fast and cost effective, making it ideal for realizing the promise of precision medicine.”

One aspect of cancer precision medicine that will be rapidly influenced by the QX200 ddPCR System is liquid biopsy, an increasingly popular technique used to noninvasively genotype tumors, track treatment efficacy and predict cancer recurrence. This form of biopsy shows great promise for guiding treatment decisions. Prospective trials are currently underway to evaluate the effectiveness of liquid biopsy in a clinical setting and, specifically, the utility of combined Droplet Digital PCR and next-generation sequencing in analyzing genomic alterations.

Since 2011, Droplet Digital PCR has been available for research use only. The technology, which partitions a DNA or RNA sample into 20,000 droplets and amplifies targeted sequences within each droplet, allows scientists to precisely detect and quantify low concentrations of target DNA and RNA sequences. This enables a range of important genomic applications, including cancer mutation detection, gene copy number determination, viral load monitoring and gene edit detection.

For more information, visit Bio- Rad’s Booth #23103 at ASCO displaying the Droplet Digital PCR QX200 and AutoDG Systems or visit www.bio-rad.com/info/asco.

About Bio-Rad

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb) develops, manufactures and markets a broad range of innovative products and solutions for the life science research and clinical diagnostic markets. The company is renowned for its commitment to quality and customer service among university and research institutions, hospitals, public health and commercial laboratories, as well as the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food safety industries.

Founded in 1952, Bio-Rad is based in Hercules, California, and serves more than 100,000 research and health care industry customers through its global network of operations. The company employs more than 7,700 people worldwide and had revenues exceeding $2 billion in 2015. For more information, please visit www.bio-rad.com.

ddPCR, Droplet Digital, AutoDC and QX200 are registered trademarks of Bio- Rad Laboratories, Inc.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Bio-Rad%E2%80%99s+QX200+ddPCR+System+is+First+Digital+PCR+Instrument+to+Receive+CE+IVD+Mark/2499679/306841/article.html.

Celprogen Introduces 3-D Cell Culture and PDX Model Systems for Oncology Research

Article Courtesy of Celprogen

Celprogen’s, CSCs, CTCs and parental cancer cells grown in 2-D can easily be killed by low doses of chemotherapeutic drugs or low doses of radiation. If those same cells are grown in 3-D, they are resistant to the same doses of chemotherapeutic drugs or radiation just like cancer as it’s found in the body. In this way, cells grown in 3-D are more valid targets for testing and discovering new drugs to treat cancer. Another benefit of testing drugs in three-dimensional cell culture versus two-dimensional cell culture is that cells in 3-D form multilayers of cells, whereas cells grown in 2-D form a monolayer of cells that is spread very thin on a plastic surface. When testing a drug in 2-D, it needs only to diffuse a short distance across the cell membrane to reach its intended target. In 3-D, the situation is more realistic and a drug needs to diffuse across multilayers of cells to reach the cells on the inside of a micro-tissue.

Please visit our website for the list and pricing of our 3-D cell culture system: www.celprogen.com/products.php? &cat_alias=3d-culture-systems

www.celprogen.com/products.php? &cat_alias=xenofree-media

Celprogen defines patient-derived tumor grafts (PDX) as explants established as models at low passage numbers (average mean of six passes removed from patient). They have not been grown in tissue culture nor propagated as cell cultures. Establishing xenograft tumor models from patientderived tumor tissue at low passage is believed to conserve original tumor characteristics such as heterogeneous histology, clinical biomolecule signature, malignant phenotypes and genotypes, tumor architecture and tumor vasculature. Based on this prevalent hypothesis, patient-derived tumor grafts are believed to offer relevant predictive insights into clinical outcomes when evaluating the efficacy of novel cancer therapies. Our models are established by implanting tissue obtained from clinical centers in the United States into mice. After a minimal number of passages through SCID and nude mice, the models are banked and then profiled.

We continuously update our comprehensive tumor model database to do the following:



Guide tumor model selection.



Support the understanding of the basis of tumor sensitivity to particular anticancer agents.


Accelerate identification of potential biomarkers.

We investigate the following characterization criteria for our PDX models:



Clinical background data (e.g., previous therapy, primary/metastatic tumor, age and gender of patient).


Tumor characteristics (e.g., time from implantation to therapy start, doubling times, special characteristics such as induction of cachexia).

Please visit our website for the list and pricing of our PDX models: www.celp rogen.com/products.php?&cat_alias= patientderived-xenografts-pdx. 310-542-8822 www.celprogen.com

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Celprogen+Introduces+3-D+Cell+Culture+and+PDX+Model+Systems+for+Oncology+Research/2499680/306841/article.html.

DiaCarta Receives CLIA Certification and Partners With Pangaea Biotech to Launch Liquid Biopsy Tests to Detect Cancer Mutations

Article Courtesy of DiaCarta

RICHMOND, Calif. — DiaCarta Inc., an innovative translational genomics and precision molecular diagnostics company, has recently announced that DiaCarta Clinical Services Laboratory successfully passed the state of California survey under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA). The state of California inspector gave DCSL permission to begin offering QClamp-based molecular diagnostic patient and clinical trial testing services. The DiaCarta-owned and operated laboratories, both in Richmond, California and Nanjing, China, enable clinical and research laboratories, as well as diagnostic and pharmaceutical companies, to incorporate complex molecular tests into clinical practice.

“We are very excited about the new addition of CLIA-certified clinical laboratory testing to our suite of product offerings. Our CLIA certification is an important regulatory milestone and demonstrates our commitment to quality laboratory testing to provide accurate, reliable and timely test results,” said Dr. Aiguo Zhang, founder and CEO of DiaCarta. “With our Independent Clinical Service Lab also in Nanjing, China, we are well-positioned to become a key companion diagnostic partner with pharmaceutical companies for global clinical trials of novel targeted therapies.”

DiaCarta has also signed a long-term agreement with Pangaea Biotech S.L. to launch noninvasive tests to detect genetic material in blood of cancer patients, a technique known as “liquid biopsy.” The tests, developed by Pangaea, allow oncologists to personalize treatment, monitor response in real time and switch therapies if necessary. DiaCarta will commercialize the assays to detect EGFR, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in the U.S. and China. In addition to making the test directly available to cancer patients through health care providers, both companies have planned to provide genetic testing and next-gen sequencing services powered by DiaCarta OptiSeq to pharmaceutical companies with novel targeted therapies for clinical trials in the U.S., Europe and China, taking advantages of DiaCarta’s CLIA and Independent Clinical Service labs in U.S. and China, respectively.

For more information about DiaCarta’s CLIA-certified lab and liquid biopsy test, visit the DiaCarta Booth #17088 at ASCO.

About DiaCarta

DiaCarta is a translational genomics and personalized diagnostics company headquartered in Richmond, California with business and clinical operations in Shanghai and Nanjing, China, respectively. We are dedicated to the science of rapid and highly sensitive detection technologies and diagnostic solutions for health care that positively impact treatment plans and improve the well-being of individuals around the world. QClamp, a revolutionary new way to screen for tumor oncogenic driver and resistance mutations in tumor DNA derived from cancer patients, utilizes a sequence-specific xeno-nucleic acid (XNA) clamp that suppresses PCR amplification on wildtype DNA template and allows selective amplification of only mutant template with detection sensitivity below 0.1 percent for a variety of samples including FFPE tissue, liquid biopsy and traditionally challenging cytology specimens. The QClamp XNA-PCR technology has also been applied for mutant DNA target enrichment on our OptiSeq next-generation sequencing platform. To learn more, visit www.diacarta.com.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/DiaCarta+Receives+CLIA+Certification+and+Partners+With+Pangaea+Biotech+to+Launch+Liquid+Biopsy+Tests+to+Detect+Cancer+Mutations/2499681/306841/article.html.

Demand Definite Answers — The Value of the Genoptix Approach

The following is a paid advertisement of Genoptix, Inc.

Genoptix Medical Laboratory is a CLIA-certified and CAP-accredited clinical laboratory that offers specialized comprehensive testing services in oncology diagnostics. Genoptix is a center of excellence for hematopathology and solid tumor molecular profiling, and serves as a collaborative partner for clinicians and pathologists requiring oncologytesting services.

Demand for molecular oncology testing has grown rapidly over recent years as the explosion in information and understanding of the molecular basis of cancer and molecular predictors of anti-cancer drug response has grown. This era of personalized medicine has heralded a need for information to allow clinicians to make appropriate clinical decisions for targeted therapies. As the treatment environment evolves, so does that of molecular analysis. While historically, single-gene PCR assays have been sufficient, multigene, next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based offerings are becoming increasingly important components of the testing paradigm.

Genoptix offers a range of testing capabilities in both hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Hematology testing includes flow cytometry, cytogenetics, FISH, PCR, Sanger sequencing, fragment size analysis, next-generation sequencing, morphology, COMPASS, CHART and second-opinion consults. Solid tumor testing capabilities include FISH, quantitative protein expression, immunohistochemistry, PCR, Sanger sequencing, fragment size analysis, nextgeneration sequencing and NexCourse reporting.

As the breadth of clinical validity evidence associated with many clinically relevant genes in oncology grows, so does the complexity of the testing paradigm. Clinicians are faced with the increasingly overwhelming task of understanding large amounts of clinical and laboratory pathology information to make decisions that will ultimately impact the outcome of the patient. Genoptix supports clinicians in this complex paradigm by helping them make definitive diagnoses and treatment decisions based on the most up-to-date, relevant information.

Genoptix provides access to a dedicated team of medical laboratory experts in oncology diagnostics. Our approach involves collaboration among laboratory scientists, molecular geneticists, pathologists and a final quality review by our clinical service coordinators.

• Each COMPASS report is managed by a hematopathologist, who directs the course of testing, iteratively adjusts the ordering workflow as medically appropriate, correlates all data from all platforms into a final result and interpretation, and is available for consultation.

• Laboratory experts facilitate best-inclass laboratory operations in all testing areas. For example, in the molecular laboratory, Genoptix employs a team of over 25 highly trained and experienced molecular genetic technologists and technicians.

• All testing cases are administratively managed by clinical service coordinators, who ensure that all patient information is correct to facilitate appropriate claims and billing, as well as seamless communication with the ordering physician.

• Genoptix employs four American Board of Medical Genetics (ABMG)-certified molecular geneticists, who consult on certain cases to ensure that only genetic alterations in clinically relevant genes are reported to the physician.

This comprehensive, collaborative approach to oncology testing is intended to help provide high-quality care for patients. Experience matters in interpreting oncology results, and Genoptix offers a comprehensive solution. For more information, call 800-755-7605, email info@genoptix.com, or visit www.genoptix.com.

COMPASS, CHART and NexCourse are registered trademarks of Genoptix, Inc.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Demand+Definite+Answers+%E2%80%94+The+Value+of+the+Genoptix+Approach/2499682/306841/article.html.

Practice Analytics: Selecting the Right Tool to Measure Efficiency of Operations and Value of Care

The U.S. health care system is changing in countless, complex ways — but perhaps no change is more farreaching than the move to value-based care. Communitybased specialty physician practices are under growing pressure to demonstrate to purchasers (patients, payers, employers, etc.) that they can deliver high-quality health care services at an affordable and competitive cost. To create a clear picture of value, practices need sophisticated software systems that enable them to analyze clinical, financial and operational data and draw measurable conclusions.

But not all data analytics platforms are equal. As practices consider an investment in a data analytics solution, they should carefully weigh their options to ensure that the system they select has the flexibility and interoperability to meet their needs today and in the future. A few of the critical questions that should be considered before selecting an analytics tool are:

How often is my data updated?

Practice leaders need to understand the different types of data sources collected, and how often this is refreshed. Analytics systems should allow each user to get specific, up-to-date information in their desired format easily.

Is the system customizable?

Before investing in an analytics system, practice leaders should investigate whether it will allow them to run customized reports around specific data sets that are important to their practice, such as benchmarking, claims denials, contract performance, drug utilization, treatment patterns and reimbursement trends.

Are there hidden restrictions?

Some analytics platforms may be offered at a low entry cost, but with restrictions such as rights to the practices’ data or limited interoperability. Analytics systems should offer the practice choices and allow flexibility over time.

How does software licensing work?

Software-licensing models have evolved as hardware costs have declined. Practices should ask about the licensing period, number of concurrent users allowed and the ability to apply the license to multiple locations.

Does the tool include training and support?

An analytics tool’s value will largely depend on the practice staff’s comfort level with the software and the staff’s ability to run reports and pull data. Practice leaders should look for tools that provide ongoing training and support.

Will the developer continue to update the system over time?

The ideal analytics system will continually add functionality to keep pace with the practice’s evolving needs, advancing technology and changing market dynamics.

Health care change is accelerating and specialty practices will feel increased pressure to redefine themselves as the industry redefines value. Having a solution that aggregates clinical, financial and operational data across their practice will be critical to good decision making, and ultimately, overall business performance. Not all practices will invest in analytics, but those that do will be well positioned to prosper in the years ahead.

To read the article in its entirety, please visit www.cardinalhealth.com/analyticstools. Make sure to visit Booth #20102 for more information on Cardinal Health.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Practice+Analytics%3A+Selecting+the+Right+Tool+to+Measure+Efficiency+of+Operations+and+Value+of+Care/2499683/306841/article.html.

Advancing Diagnostics Through Innovations

Article Courtesy of Novodiax

Novodiax is a California-based corporation, located in the San Francisco Bay Area. Novodiax has developed a proprietary supersensitive signal amplification technology through intelligent structural designs and optimal polymerization. The first product of this technology, polyHRP (horseradish peroxidase) has demonstrated superior detection sensitivity at low background in various applications, such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ELISA in comparison to the popular or “Gold-Standard” products in the current market (refer to the photo).

Our technology platform provides powerful tools for researchers who seek higher sensitivity and fewer steps in their assay development. Further developed from technology, we provide now both service package and a product line of “Direct IHC” in which no secondary antibody is needed. All our Direct IHC products use a 10-min IHC protocol. Our Direct IHC service allows you to perform those difficult IHC with human antibody on human tissue, or mouse antibody on mouse tissue, and provides you a potential to use your therapeutic antibody as a CDx tool for itself.

Novodiax resolves the background issue in your IHC when you use human antibody on human tissue or mouse antibody on mouse tissue.

Novodiax helps your ELISA stand out with higher sensitivity.

Find out more at Booth #2117 and www.novodiax.com.

Read the full article at http://pubs.royle.com/article/Advancing+Diagnostics+Through+Innovations/2499684/306841/article.html.

Bio-Rad

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